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Khidr Collective: Late at Tate

Updated: Feb 21, 2019



On the 1st June 2018, we took part in a ‘Late at Tate’ event at Tate Britain. During each event Tate Britain opens its galleries after hours, attracting up to 2000 people aged 18-25 to enjoy music, workshops, live performances, talks, special guests and DJs and debate, all taking inspiration from the Tate Collection.


Three of our members, Zain, Raeesah and Nadine took part in a panel discussion that explored faith and creativity in response to John Constable’s painting ‘Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows’.


Despite this piece being painted in the 1800s, and being one of the less interesting paintings you’re made to look at during school trips to art galleries, the Tate took the underlying themes from the painting and Constable’s life, trying to make them relatable to current day and the work of young artists.


Constable’s relationship with faith was prominent in his work, his Christian beliefs no doubt affected the way he portrayed the world. In contemporary society and with a move away from institutionalized religious governance, religion is less prominent in artistic endeavours — that is not to say that it doesn’t exist. Hip hop is one art form where artists who wish to express their faith have not shied away from it. The heavy influence of gospel music in hip hop as well as lyrics referencing Christianity and Islam are there to be found for anyone looking.


We discussed what faith meant for us as artists and people organising in arts spaces. The difficulty of overcoming the anxiety of being bold in expressing your faith in your art in a world that mostly rejects merging the two together, or at least makes it harder to gain successes when you’re so clear with your faith. But also the value in having these spaces that despite not everyone being a member of a faith community, being open and interested in understanding the way artists from faith-based backgrounds produce new and refreshing perspectives in film, music, and more.


You can listen to the talk here.